Future World Technology Essay Topic

Life In The Future (2050)

The 2000s decade came with revolutions in many fields and sectors across the world. The internet kicked in and revolutionized the world, bringing forth things not thought of previously. In line with that, social media has made people more interconnected. From 2010, many more new inventions have been attained, and the trend seems to continue at a steady rate. The life ahead can only be uncertain, full of surprises. This paper evaluates the possible future scenarios and life in the next three decades, specifically by 2050.

The 21st century is dominated by more technology-oriented inventions than before. The 20th century saw man land on the moon. The 21st century will witness man land on several of the many planets that dot the universe. The first will be Mars, also called the Red Planet. The mission is likely to be accomplished by 2030, as planned by the NASA. That will become history and will set a precedent for future explorations by subsequent human generations. Furthermore, increased investment in research activities is likely to lead to the discovery of a vaccine for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS).

Need an essay customized under your requirements? We can help you


Sexual and gender issues are another aspect that will change by 2050. Homosexuality has become a familiar spectacle in the current generation. Lesbians, gays, bisexual, and transgendered (LGBT) issues are broadly recognized. By 2050, this is likely to be such a universally accepted factor that the law will require employers across the world to set aside a percentage of their employment vacancies such as 30% of all positions to LGBT employees. Such a requirement will run alongside the existing gender-based directive of same female and male employee ratio.

Technology is fast advancing. Social media at present acts as one of the leading source of news and interaction. It poses a threat to traditional sources of media including television, newspapers, radios, and magazines. By 2025, some of the traditional media sources, specifically print newspapers will have little role to play as online newspapers and social media will have taken over the market. Mobile phones will play a greater role in the purchase of goods, withdrawal, and deposit of money. Electronic money will replace paper money. Additionally, with the declining oil reserves across the world, electric cars will substitute petrol cars in the next few decades. Consequently, there will be a major shift in job trends.

The United States made history in 2016 by electing a president with no prior experience in political matters. The electorate is breaking away from the traditional mentality of electing experienced, tested-and-approved politicians. It is adopting a whole new approach. To say that a female president will be elected into office as president after President Donald Trump’s era will not be far from the truth. By 2050, the U.S. will have tasted feminine leadership. Also, if the current trend of the President Trump anti-immigration policy and deportation of illegal immigrants gets adequate support and following in subsequent leaderships, the United States will have a stunted population growth and very few cases of immigration. Such policies will significantly reduce U.S influence across the world.

Additionally, global warming will become an even bigger problem. Sea levels will continue to rise, and freshwater sources will be polluted. Fresh water will become a major issue hence environmental destruction will increase significantly. From another perspective, dictator tendencies, chiefly in Asia, will destabilize the world. North Korea, China, and other upcoming nuclear-armed countries will become major security threats to the entire world. Unless well handled, such countries will facilitate increased regional wars, but World War 3 will not occur. Accordingly, terrorist groups will dominate major regions of the world.

How many of us can say, with certainty, what jobs we would choose if we were kids today? The pace of technological change in the time I’ve been in work is only a shadow of what we will see over the next 15 to 20 years. This next wave of change will fundamentally reshape all of our careers, my own included.

We expect the pace of change in the job market to start to accelerate by 2020. Office and administrative functions, along with manufacturing and production roles, will see dramatic declines accounting for over six million roles over the next four years. Conversely, business and financial operations along with computer and mathematical functions will see steep rises.

There is a central driver for many of these transformations, and it is technology.

Artificial intelligence, 3D printing, resource-efficient sustainable production and robotics will factor into the ways we currently make, manage and mend products and deliver services. The latter two have the potential to create jobs in the architectural and engineering sectors, following high demand for advanced automated production systems.

When the World Economic Forum surveyed global HR decision-makers, some 44% pointed to new technologies enabling remote working, co-working space and teleconferencing as the principal driver of change. Concurrently, advances in mobile and cloud technology allowing remote and instant access were singled out as the most important technological driver of change, enabling the rapid spread of internet-based service models.

It’s worth reflecting on how we could imagine a changed world like this.

Our future place of work might not be an open plan office, but interconnected workspaces not tied to one place, but many. They will be underpinned by virtual conferencing, complete and constant connection and portability.

Our working day will be fundamentally different. Leveraging big data, like real-time traffic information, could cut journey times, making the school run easier, and the morning commute more manageable. That is, if you have to commute: home-working will no longer be defined as a Friday luxury, but a more efficient way to work enabled by technology, taking the physical strain from megacities and regionalising work locations.

Technology underpinning what futurologists have christened ‘The Fourth Industrial Revolution’ will enable disruptive business models to decentralise our economies as we move from value systems based on ownership to ones enabling access. Personally owned assets, from cars to spare bedrooms, will expand entrepreneurship, diversifying revenue streams. It’s no fluke that within three years of trading, home-sharing platform Airbnb offers more rooms than some of the biggest hotel chains.

These disruptive business models will fundamentally reshape how we do business, both individually and as companies. For example, digitally enabling smallholder farmers can allow them to operate as a collective, transferring knowledge and sharing vital learnings with each other from proper crop irrigation technology to water efficiency. Cloud-based analytics hosted on BT’s Expedite platform can assist in radically transforming such supply chains.

Critically, these very technologies might help us unlock the solutions to some of the biggest societal challenges we currently grapple with. The ICT underpinning these technologies, in consort with the transformational power of big data, could support smart systems that will help tackle climate challenges. Connected homes, factories and farms leveraging smart energy management systems could mean dramatically lower energy use, which would contribute to the decarbonisation of our economies.

And yet we must be vigilant. Not of technological change; we have the power and innovation to harness and use its power as we see fit. But of access to the connectivity and opportunity it brings.

What will be absolutely decisive is how we equip our children, our students and our colleagues to harness the power of this technology to transform our world for the better. That means ensuring the ICT skills of current school leavers are fit for the future. It means providing incentives for lifelong learning as the pace of technological advancement quickens. And it means reinventing the HR function, equipping it to continually assess and provide for the training needs of employees.

If we get this right the prize is clear. We have the potential to revolutionise the way we live and work and do it in a way that avoids the vicissitudes of previous industrial revolutions, creating new economic opportunities that, even as children, we would not have before imagined.

Lastly, we must use every tool within our armoury to ensure the current and future generations are not left behind in the global digital skills race.

The Future of Jobs report is available here.

Share

Written by

Niall Dunne, Chief Executive Officer, Polymateria Limited

The views expressed in this article are those of the author alone and not the World Economic Forum.

Subscribe for updates

A weekly update of what’s on the Global Agenda

0 thoughts on “Future World Technology Essay Topic

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *