Essay Writing Contest 2014 Malaysia Aeroplane

Malaysia Airlines flight 370 disappearance, disappearance of a Malaysia Airlines passenger jet on March 8, 2014, during a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. The disappearance of the Boeing 777 with 227 passengers and 12 crew members on board led to a search effort stretching from the Indian Ocean west of Australia to Central Asia.

Flight 370 took off at 12:41 am local time. It reached a cruising altitude of 10,700 metres (35,000 feet) at 1:01 am. The Aircraft Communication Addressing and Reporting System (ACARS), which transmitted data about the aircraft’s performance, sent its last transmission at 1:07 am and was subsequently switched off. The last voice communication from the crew occurred at 1:19 am, and at 1:21 am the plane’s transponder, which communicated with air-traffic control, was switched off, just as the plane was about to enter Vietnamese airspace over the South China Sea. Thai military radar detected at 1:28 am what was likely flight 370 near its last known position; instead of continuing its route to the northeast, it was heading to the west. At 2:15 am Malaysian military radar possibly detected the plane over the Strait of Malacca, flying northwest. An Inmarsat satellite in geostationary orbit over the Indian Ocean received hourly signals from flight 370 and detected the plane for the final time at 8:11 am.

Initial searches for the plane concentrated on the South China Sea. After it was determined that flight 370 had turned to the west shortly after the transponder was switched off, search efforts moved to the Strait of Malacca and the Andaman Sea. On March 15, a week after the plane had disappeared, the Inmarsat contact was disclosed. Analysis of the signal could not locate the plane precisely but did determine that the plane might have been anywhere on two arcs, one stretching from Java southward into the Indian Ocean southwest of Australia and the other stretching northward across Asia from Vietnam to Turkmenistan. The search area was then expanded to encompass the Indian Ocean southwest of Australia on the southern arc and Southeast Asia, western China, the Indian subcontinent, and Central Asia on the northern arc. On March 24 Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak announced that, based on analysis of the final signals, Inmarsat and the U.K. Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB) had concluded that the flight crashed in a remote part of the Indian Ocean 2,500 km (1,500 miles) southwest of Australia. Thus, it was extremely unlikely that anyone on board survived.

The search for wreckage continued. However, it was hampered by the remote location of the crash site. Beginning on April 6, an Australian ship detected several acoustic pings possibly from the Boeing 777’s flight recorder (or “black box”) about 2,000 km (1,200 miles) northwest of Perth. Further analysis by the AAIB of the Inmarsat data also found a partial signal from the plane at 8:19 am that was consistent with the location of the acoustic pings. The last acoustic pings were heard on April 8. If the signals were from flight 370, the flight recorder was likely at the end of its battery life, and further searches were conducted using an unmanned submarine.

In the weeks following the plane’s disappearance, possible explanations for what had happened to flight 370 ranged broadly from mechanical failure to pilot suicide. The loss of the plane’s ACARS and transponder signals, however, spurred ongoing speculation about some form of hijacking as a likely possibility. However, there were no immediate claims of responsibility by any individual or group, and it seemed unlikely that hijackers would have flown the plane to the southern Indian Ocean.

The first piece of debris was not found until July 29, 2015, when a wing flap was discovered on a beach on the French island of Réunion, about 3,700 km (2,300 miles) west of the Indian Ocean area that was being searched by Australian authorities. It was impossible to determine where flight 370 crashed on the basis of the Réunion wreckage, but investigators hoped that study of the wing flap would reveal how flight 370 ended.

This annual essay contest is organized in an effort to harness the energy, creativity and initiative of the world's youth in promoting a culture of peace and sustainable development. It also aims to inspire society to learn from the young minds and to think about how each of us can make a difference in the world.

*This program is an activity of the UNESCO Global Action Programme (GAP) on Education for Sustainable Development (ESD).

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For further inquiries concerning the International Essay Contest for Young People, please contact essay@goipeace.or.jp

Organized by

The Goi Peace Foundation

Endorsed by

The Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan
Japanese National Commission for UNESCO, Japan Private High School Federation
Tokyo Metropolitan Board of Education, Japan Broadcasting Corporation, Nikkei Inc.

Supported by

FELISSIMO CORPORATION, SEIKO HOLDINGS CORPORATION

Essay Contest 2018 Flyer (PDF)

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FAQ

Q1Are there any exceptions to the age limit for participating in the contest?

A1No, you must be 25 years old or younger as of June 15, 2018, which is the entry deadline date. That means you must be born after June 15, 1993. On the other hand, there is no minimum age requirement.

Q2Is there a fee for participating in this contest?

A2No, participation is free of charge.

Q3Do I have to be Japanese or Asian to join the contest?

A3A3: No, all nationalities can participate from anywhere in the world.

Q4My essay is a little over 700 words. Is it acceptable?

A4No, essays must be 700 words or less in order to qualify. However, the cover page and essay title are excluded from the word count. There is no minimum word count.

Q5Are the title and cover page included in the word count limit?

A5No, the 700 word count limit is for the body of the essay only.

Q6Do I need a cover page for my essay submitted online?

A6No, a cover page is only required for entries submitted by postal mail. For online entries, all required information is submitted through the registration form, and therefore, you do not need to include a cover page in your essay file.

Q7Can I give any title to my essay?

A7Yes, you can give your essay an original title as long as the content is in line with the theme.

Q8Is there a specific format for the essay (font style, size, line space, etc.)?

A8There are no particular rules regarding formatting. However, your essay file should be submitted in either MS Word(DOC/DOCX) or PDF format.

Q9Can I quote from books or websites? If so, where should I write the reference?

A9If you use quotations, please include the reference at the bottom of the essay. The reference should not be included in the word count.

Q10Can I add photos, images, or my biography to my essay?

A10No. Please send your essay only.

Q11Can I submit my essay via email?

A11No, we do not accept entries by email. Please submit your essay either by postal mail or through the online registration page: http://goipeace-essaycontest.org/* This link will be activated soon.

Q12Can I submit a hand-written essay?

A12Yes, we accept hand-written essays. You can either send it by postal mail or submit a scanned PDF copy through the online registration page: http://goipeace-essaycontest.org/* This link will be activated soon.

Q13Can I submit more than one essay?

A13Yes, you can submit more than one essay as long as the contents are different. They can also be written in different languages. Please use the same account to submit multiple essays online.

Q14Can I submit my essay in my native language?

A14Essays are accepted in English, French, Spanish, German or Japanese only, since these are the only languages the contest organizers and judges can read. However, we can accept essays written in other languages, if they are accompanied by translations in one of the accepted languages.

Q15Can we co-write and submit one essay as a team?

A15No. Essays must be written by one person. Co-authored essays are not accepted.

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