Family Folklore Assignment

Date of Items:1979 to present
Collection Processed by:Originally processed by Barbara [Garrett] Walker, updated by Maria Walters and Randy Williams
Register Prepared by:Charity Lund and Randy Williams; updated by Randy Williams, 22 December 2009
Last Updated:February 2006
Linear Feet:40
Restrictions:Patrons must sign and comply with the USU Special Collections and Archives Use Agreement and Reproduction order form as well as any restrictions placed by the collector or informant(s).

Please cite as:


The Utah State University Undergraduate Student Fieldwork Collection consists of USU student folklore projects from 1979 to the present. The collection continues to grow.


The Utah State University Undergraduate Student Fieldwork Collection is comprised of focused folklore projects created by USU students enrolled in upper division undergraduate folklore courses from 1979 to the present. The projects were deposited in the Fife Folklore Archives by the course instructors, including Professors Patricia Gardner, Jan Roush, Steve Siporin, Jeannie Thomas, Barre Toelken, and William A. Wilson and instructors Michael Christensen, Barbara [Garrett] Walker and Randy Williams. The collection was created in 1979 by Barbara Lloyd.


The Utah State University Undergraduate Student Fieldwork Collection consists of approximately 800 projects collected by Utah State University students in fulfillment of graded credit requirements for an upper division undergraduate folklore course. Most items include title page, table of contents, cover essay, and several folklore items with informant, context, text (the folklore item), texture (stylistic notation), and collector data. Collector and informant release forms accompany most of the collections from 1986 forward. The projects examine a wide variety of topics ranging from specific genres (like jokes, legends, beliefs, folksongs) to area interests (such as regional, occupational, and family folklore). The Collection inventory includes a subject index (for items prior to 2000) and a register. The register includes the item number, student name, title of the project, number of items, content description, and release form and restriction information. Items are numbered by the year the student submitted the project to their instructor and the individual number of the item. The items are stored in archival boxes. The materials do NOT circulate. Click for information on folklore collecting assignments for folklore classes, including examples.


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Box 1

71-001 Rushing, June Camp Songs
170 items (Folk songs)
No Release Forms

79-001Andrews, Bonnie
Uranium Fever: How the Mines Got Their Names
16 items (Occupational Lore: Etiological)
No Release Forms

79-002Bennion, Susan B.Vernon Buslore
21 items (Children�s Lore: Pranks, Teasing, Games, Songs)
No Release Forms

79-003Bickmore, Janice MaeAn Evening with Otto Fife
17 items (Character Legends: George W. Middleton, Butch Cassidy, Leno Martinez, Harry Lowder, Death Valley Scotty, John MacFarlane; Regional Lore: Utah; Folk Song; Mission Field Story)
No Release Forms

79-004Bird, ChristineThe Legend of Redgie Child from Springville
15 items (Legends: Character, Supernatural)
No Release Forms

79-005Bonebrake, Bruce L.Hunting and Fishing Folklore
41 items (Traditions; Sayings; Jokes; Superstitions; Stories; Legends; Tall-Tales)
No Release Forms

79-006Capson, JenniferSongs for Every Occasion: A Collection of Sigma Chi Fraternity Songs
(Gamma Kappa Chapter)

11 items (Folk Songs)
No Release Forms

79-007Christensen, Kaye LynSauerkraut: A Providence Specialty
30 items (Customs; Poetry; Narratives; Recipes; Can Labels - Photographs from Newspaper Clippings)
No Release Forms

79-008Erni, Konrad ArthurFamily Folklore
16 items (Holiday Customs: August 1st, Christmas, Games, Songs, Remedies, Recipes)
No Release Forms

79-009Freeman, Mary AnnStreet Games
8 items (Children�s Lore: Games)
No Release Forms

79-010Hansen, Debby"I Drink To Cardinal Puff" and Other Drinking Games
11 items (Adult Games; Songs)
No Release Forms

79-011Hara, SonokoJapanese Ghost Stories
16 items (Tradition; Beliefs; Legends: Supernatural)
No Release Forms

79-012Harrison, RickLegends and Folklore of the Geneva, Switzerland Mission Told by Brad Berg
25 items (Religious Lore: LDS: Missionary Stories, Legends, Memorates)
No Release Forms

79-013Ipson, JerolynLegends from Bolivia
14 items (Legend: Supernatural, Historical; Folk Tales)
No Release Forms
Box 279-014Jackman, PatHistory of Levi Jackman
1 item (Regional Lore: Utah: Personal History Narrative)
No Release Forms

79-015Lamb, RonSonglore: Lullabies and Welsh Folksongs
10 items (Family Folklore: Songs - Score Included)
No Release Forms

79-016Miller, AnnEarly Life in River Heights, Utah
1 item (Regional Lore: River Heights, Utah; Personal History Narrative)
No Release Forms

79-017Millette, Janet L.Pranks
17 items (Young Adult Folklore: Pranks)
No Release Forms

79-018Nelson, CarolynThe First Homes of Bear River City
12 items (Regional Folklore: Northern Utah: Vernacular Architecture: Homes, Barns, Mailboxes)
No Release Forms

79-019Payne, KentChildren's Folklore: Rhymes, Songs, Games
19 items (Choosing Rhymes; Playground Games; Songs)
No Release Forms

79-020Petersen, GaryFolk Medicine
19 items (Folk Cures: Infections, Warts, Burns, Croup, Animal Cures)
No Release Forms

79-021Posey, SaraFraternity Pranks
17 items (USU Fraternity and Sorority Pranks: Chi Omega, Sigma Phi Epsilon, Sigma Alpha Epsilon)
No Release Forms

79-022Salter, ShellyCamp Songs
21 items (Songs: Actions, Rounds, Spiritual Songs)
No Release Forms

79-023Sawaya, JeanetteFolklore
21 items (Dead Baby Jokes; Proverbs; Folk Songs; Pranks; Folk Remedies; Superstitions: Pregnancy; Fraternity Initiation; Doodles; Ghost Stories: �Vanishing Hitchhiker;� Legends; Legend Tripping; Camp Ghost Story)
No Release Forms
Box 379-024Stucki, CarlaDesert Rains: Memories of Santa Clara
62 items (Regional Lore: Southern Utah: Pioneer Stories; Religious Folklore: LDS - Index and Notes Included)
No Release Forms

79-025Thorley, ColleenThree Nephite Stories
9 items (Religious Folklore: LDS: Legends, Supernatural)
No Release Forms

79-026Vance, Bonnie MarieThe Gift of Water Witching
6 items (Beliefs: Methods of Water Witching)
No Release Forms

79-027Walker, BarbaraChildren's Folklore
19 items (Rhymes: Counting-Out Rhymes; Games; Superstitions)
No Release Forms

79-028Worthington, MikePranks
12 items MISSING

79-029Yeager, CraigFolk Memories of the Yeager Children
15 items (Children�s Folklore: Trick Games, Tongue Twisters, Hodji Folk Tales, Personal Narratives)
No Release Forms

80-001Bachman, TammyFolk Cures
44 items (Folk Remedies: Preventative Folk Medicine, Health Superstitions)
No Release Forms

80-002Brockman, TerrieWhat Keeps Us Together: My Family's Traditions
4 items (Holiday Customs: Christmas, Nicknames - Photographs Included)
No Release Forms

80-003Casamassa, Glenn P.The Art of Droodles?
12 items (Material/Written Folklore: Doodles - Handwritten Illustrations Included)
No Release Forms

80-004Clines, William G.Deadman Hunting Camp: Greys River, Wyoming
22 items (Family Traditions; Regional Folklore)
No Release Forms

80-005Codiga, Linda M.Fast Food Horror Stories
17 items (Urban Legends: �Kentucky Fried Rats� and Others)
No Release Forms

80-006Cowan, Christy E.Unforgettable and Alarming Accounts
30 items (Urban Legends; Supernatural; Regional Folklore: Utah, Bolivia, New York, Philippines, New Jersey, Wyoming, Illinois, Wisconsin)
No Release Forms
Box 480-007Dewey, LindaHumorous Stories in LDS Meetings
22 items (Religious Folklore: LDS)
No Release Forms

80-008Falk, JenniferGrowing Up Gentile
46 items (Religious Folklore: Exoteric LDS Stories, Jokes)
No Release Forms

80-009Fausett, SuzzanneFolk Legends
8 items (Regional Folklore: Utah: Native American Legends)
No Release Forms

80-010Fausett, SuzzanneFolk Legends and Songs
7 items (Regional Folklore: Utah: Folk Song - Handwritten)
No Release Forms

80-011Ghicadus, Ann C.A Study of Aging Barns in Cache Valley
4 items (Regional Lore; Material Culture: Architecture: Barns, Gable, Salt-Box,
Gambrel, Hip - 18 Photographs Included)
No Release Forms

80-012Grant, TrishaA Sister Missionary
25 items (Religious Folklore: LDS: Missionary, Jokes, Pranks)
No Release Forms

80-013Harvath, Victoria D.Collection of Verna Rainey Daines
16 items (Proverbs; Folk Songs; Poems)
No Release Forms

80-014Hoy, BethThe "Colonel" Charles Edwin Loose
18 items (Family Narratives; Character Legends)
No Release Forms

80-015Jackman, PatsyPolish Jokes
28 items (Jokes)
No Release Forms

80-016Kay, KristiSkier's Folklore
14 items (Memorates; Humorous Stories; Recreational Folklore)
No Release Forms
Box 580-017 Kerr, RebeccaEpitaphs of Box Elder County
90 items (Cemetery Lore: Epitaphs, Grave Markers - 4 Photographs Included)
No Release Forms

80-018King, JulieDetermining the Marital Unknown
26 items. (Beliefs and Superstitions: Future Spouse - Illustrations and Folded
Example Included)
No Release Forms

80-019Knopsnyder, ChristinaInitiation Pranks Done to �Green� Mormon Missionaries
17 items (Religious Folklore: LDS: Missionary, Initiation, Pranks)
No Release Forms

80-020Livesay, Lorie M.The White Lady
13 items (Regional Lore: Utah, Carbon County: Occupational Lore: Mining, Ghost Stories)
No Release Forms

80-021Luhn, KimTraditions Among Roman Catholic Families
14 items (Family Holiday Traditions: Christmas, Easter; Religious Lore: Catholic; Family Customs)
No Release Forms

80-022McBride, WayneHunting Stories
13 items (Recreational Lore: Hunting, Family Lore, Memorates)
No Release Forms

80-023McCarthy, CurtisAnecdotes of the Order of Aaron
21 items (Regional Lore: Utah: Religious Folklore: Order of Aaron)
No Release Forms

80-024Miles, KristyFaith Promoting Stories of the Franklin W. Miles and George P. Stock Families
14 items (Family Stories; Religious Folklore: LDS Spiritual Narratives)
No Release Forms

80-025Miller, Jerry W.Miscellaneous Missionary Mischief
15 items (Religious Folklore: LDS Missionary; Initiation, Legends)
No Release Forms

80-026Morris, MichelleMissionary Experiences
18 items (Religious Folklore: LDS Missionary; Personal Narrative)
No Release Forms

80-027Nielson, Joseph MarkHand-Me-Downs
11 items (Family Folklore: Sayings, Songs, Folk Remedies)
No Release Forms
Box 680-028Olsen, LindaFolklore of Children
27 items (Children�s Folklore: Counting Out Rhymes; Chants)
No Release Forms

80-029Peterson, Mary Kay G."Dad" Stories � Folklore of Raymond Parley Peterson
21 items (Family Folklore: Character Legends, Nicknames)
No Release Forms

80-030Pulley, AllenMissionary Folklore
34 items (Religious Folklore: LDS Missionary, Initiation, Personal Narratives)
No Release Forms

80-031Rawlins, ChipA Buck and Pole Primer
(Detailed Descriptions of How and Why to Build a Buck and Pole Fence - Illustrated)
No Release Form

80-032Rock, TomSpooky Stories of Utah
11 items (Urban Legends: Ghost Stories: �Flip Flop Man,� �The Golden Arm,� and Others)
No Release Forms

80-033Scearce, MaryHiccough Cures
66 items (Folk Remedies)
No Release Forms

80-034Shaw, DonaldFraternity Songs
17 items (College Lore: Fraternities, Songs, Drinking, Public, Obscene)
No Release Forms

80-035Snyder, Fred R.Fraternity Traditions
19 items (College Lore: Fraternities, Customs/Traditions)
No Release Forms

80-036Sorensen, Nancy L.Unique Dates and Engagements
80 items (Regional Lore: Utah: Customs, Dating, Engagements, Memorates)
No Release Forms

80-037Stock, Richard C.Gunsmith Folklore
18 items (Occupational Lore: Pranks)
No Release Forms
Box 780-038Thatcher, ElaineYou've Got to Pay Your Dues
31 items (Occupational Lore: Musician: Customs/Beliefs)
No Release Forms

80-039Thatcher, ElaineGet Your Ax, We've Got A Gig
43 items (Occupational Lore: Musician: Sayings, Jargon)
No Release Forms

80-040Thummel, Robert N.Paratrooper Folklore
16 items (Occupational Lore: Song; Legend, Pranks, Jargon, Initiation - Illustrations and Glossary Included)
No Release Forms

80-041Webb, CurtisDusting Off of the Feet
14 items (Religious Lore: LDS Missionary, Legends)
No Release Forms

80-042Winward, Calvin L.The Grandchildren Speak
56 items (Family Folklore; Children�s Folklore: Sayings)
No Release Forms

80-043Woodward, AprilPie Safes and Their Patterns
29 items (Material Culture: Pie Safes - Illustrations and Photographs Included)
No Release Forms

80-044Woodward, NanNames, Characters, and Characteristics of Hyrum, Utah
64 items (Regional Lore; Character Legends; Etiological Lore: Nicknames)
No Release Forms

80-045Worthington, MikePranks
12 items (Young Adult Lore; Children�s Lore)
No Release Forms

80-046Wunderman, CarynThe Beliefs and Traditions of Mrs. Joan R. Pack
18 items (Superstitions/Beliefs)
No Release Forms

80-047Zander, RondaMy Family Folklore
22 items (Holiday Customs: Christmas, Easter, Birthdays, Foodways, Games, Sayings, Beliefs)
No Release Forms
Box 881-001Ahlstrom, AnneLeland Erastus Anderson: Growing Up in Ephraim
59 items (Regional Folklore: Utah: Character Legend)
Release Forms Included: RESTRICTIONS

81-002Clark, JennyMormon Family Traditions and Practices
(Family Folklore: Traditions, Holiday Customs, Dating Customs, Religious Lore: LDS)
No Release Forms

81-003Durtschi, TammyLegends of Logan Canyon
12 items (Regional Folklore: �St. Anne�s Retreat,� �Witch Hecida,� Legend Tripping Narratives)
No Release Forms

81-004Heninger, MichaelThe Folklore of One Missionary
74 items (Religious Folklore: LDS Missionary, Legends, Initiation, Relations with Other Churches)
No Release Forms

81-005Johnson, Lyle D.Public Prayers in the Mormon Church
33 items (Religious Folklore: LDS - Original Handwritten Survey Items Included)
No Release Forms

81-006Murray, Scott E.The Birds and the Bees: Sex Education in Mormonism
10 items (Memorates: Personal Narratives)
No Release Forms

81-007Price, TinaMiraculous Healings
9 items (Religious Folklore: Cross-Denominational, Personal Narratives)
No Release Forms

81-008Rice, Scott L.Scott Jensen on Missionaries and Hunting
15 items (Religious Lore: LDS Missionary, Initiation, Memorates, Legend: �Three Nephite Story�)
No Release Forms

81-009Stewart, DonnaFolklore of Cottey Cottage
15 items (College Lore: Songs, Traditions)
No Release Forms

82-001Abel, KrisFolksongs from Mormon Missionaries
27 items (Religious Lore: LDS Missionary, Folk Songs)
No Release Forms
Box 982-002Acevedo, DannyFamily Folk
9 items (Family Folklore: History, Legends)
No Release Forms

82-003Adams, PhillipRegional Folklore
15 items (Southern Utah: Legends)
No Release Forms

82-004Allingham, DebbieRiver Lore
10 items (Regional Folklore: Legends, Songs, Games, Superstitions, Foods)
No Release Forms

82-005Amussen, MarkTueller Reunion
MISSING

82-006Amundson, JimMormon Missionary Beliefs
10 items (Religious Lore: LDS: Beliefs, Customs, Initiation)
No Release Forms

82-007Anderson, AnnDating
21 items (Customs; Memorates)
No Release Forms

82-008Anderson, CalliPersonal Folklore of Jenalee Butterfield and Dixie Anderson
MISSING

82-009Ashman, KentHow Do You Choose a Good Watermelon?
17 items (Foodways: Beliefs, Customs)
No Release Forms

82-010Baer, ConnieMedical Folklore
31 items (Folk Remedies: Health Superstitions)
No Release Forms

82-011Barratt, William P.The Barratt Family
10 items (Traditions: Holiday, Other)
No Release Forms

82-012Bennion, Elizabeth B.The Generous Sage
41 items (Family Folklore: Stories, History; Legends: Character - Butch Cassidy,
Porter Rockwell; Toys; Religious Lore: LDS)
No Release Forms

82-013Bitsilly, FloraBehavior Modes of Navajo Children
19 items (Stories; Traditions; Beliefs/Superstitions; Jokes)
No Release Forms

82-014Blair, DellInterviews at Sunshine Terrace
7 items (Regional Lore: Utah: Memorates)
No Release Forms
Box 1082-015Blair, DellShaping the Meaning of Songs
13 items (Folk Songs: Stories About Songs - Tape Included)
No Release Forms

82-016Bowen, DavidLegends of the Ancestors of David Bowen
10 items (Family Folklore: History, Legends)
No Release Forms

82-017Borthwick, SandyEthnic Jokes
11 items (Riddles; Ethnic Jokes: Mexican, Black, Polish)
No Release Forms

82-018Brinton, KimSuperstitions
40 items (Luck: Good, Bad - Illustrations Included)
No Release Forms

82-019Brooks, Ray S.Paternal Experiences
21 items (Family Folklore: History, Character Legends: Walter S. Brooks)
No Release Forms

82-020Brubaker, RobertLanguage and Legends of Carbon County
19 items (Regional Folklore; Utah: Occupational Lore: Mining: Legends, Superstitions, Vocabulary, Initiation)
No Release Forms

82-021Buttars, DilynnLullabies, Children, and Adolescent Songs
23 items (Children�s Folklore: Songs with Words Only, No Score - Tape Included)
No Release Forms

82-022Call, LaWanaFolklore at the Green Family Christmas Party
18 items (Family Folklore: Personal Narratives, Sayings, Holidays)
No Release Forms

82-023Carlson, MikeA Pictorial Guide to Epitaphs
66 items (Cemetery Lore: Epitaphs, Logan, Utah Cemetery - Pictures Included)
No Release Forms
Box 1182-024Carr, Chad C.The Hook
10 items (Urban Legend - Variations)
No Release Forms

82-025Chlarson, ChrisManifestations Found in the Mission Field
18 items (Religious Lore: LDS Missionary, Supernatural)
No Release Forms

82-026Dalley, Leland S.The Past Lives Again
17 items (Regional: Utah - Mostly Authored Verse and Song)
No Release Forms

82-027Daniels, EvaBeliefs and Traditions Associated with Childbearing
11 items (Human Condition Folklore)
No Release Forms

82-028Dewey, EllenReport on Ballads
8 items (Folk Ballads: Cowboy, Drinking)
No Release Forms

82-029Donoho, DeliaHoliday Foodways of the Pennsylvania Dutch
15 items (Holiday Folklore: Birthdays, Christmas, Halloween, Thanksgiving; Ethnic Lore, Traditions, Foodways)
No Release Forms

82-030Downs, David W.Proverbial Comparisons
20 items (Sayings: Proverbs)
No Release Forms

82-031Dye, GaryOil Field Folklore
10 items (Occupational Lore: Customs, Initiation, Superstitions, Jargon)
No Release Forms

82-032Ekblad, LoryGames
10 items (Children�s Folklore: Games)
No Release Forms

82-033Essig, Clay T.Legends of Lost Mines and Treasures
19 items (Regional Lore: Utah: Occupational Lore: Legends)
No Release Forms

82-034Fluckiger, BrendaChildren's Games
17 items (Children�s Folklore: Games)
No Release Forms
Box 1282-035Fullmer, Rex O.BYU Jokelore Collected at USU
23 items (College Lore: Jokes)
No Release Forms

82-036Gass, Cindy LeeProverbial Insults
15 items (Folk Say: Proverbs, Wisecracks/Insults)
No Release Forms

82-037George, DeAnneA Collection of Folklore from the Family of Revell George
17 items (Family Folklore: Songs, Games, Recipes, Stories - Handwritten)
No Release Forms

82-038Gereaux, Julia KimCures for the Pain of Arthritis
18 items (Medical Folklore: Remedies)
No Release Forms

82-039Gereaux, Julia KimLaments of Parents, Epitaphs of Children
21 items (Cemetery Lore: Epitaphs)
No Release Forms

82-040Gordon, T.J.Folklore's "Twilight Zone" Stories of the Paranormal
16 items (Legend: Supernatural - Survey and Student Essays Included)
No Release Forms

82-041Gurr, AlanWeird Tales I've Told
15 items (Legends: Supernatural, Ghost Stories)
No Release Forms

82-042Hansen, ElaineMormon Missionary Folklore: Greenie Jokes and Pranks
40 items (LDS Missionary Lore: Jokes; Pranks; Initiation)
No Release Forms

82-043Hansen, Ray BDon't Ever Leave Your Companions or Else...
15 items (LDS Missionary Lore: Cautionary Tales)
No Release Forms

82-044Harries, ScottFolklore of the Dance World
10 items (Occupational Lore: Beliefs, Customs)
No Release Forms
Box 1382-045Hassan, AhmedProverbs
10 items (Regional Lore: Somalia: Proverbs)
No Release Forms

82-046Hill, JeanneComfort for the Discouraged Genealogist
23 items (Personal Narratives; Supernatural; Songs)
No Release Forms

82-047Hunt, KellyHiccup Cures
10 items (Folk Remedies)
No Release Forms

82-048Irvine, PattyFolk Games
10 items (Children�s Folklore: Games)
No Release Forms

82-049Iverson, JeriFolklore of Grandpa and Grandma
13 items (Practical Jokes; Riddle Jokes; Superstitions; Games; Sayings)
No Release Forms

82-050Johnson, PamChildhood Games of Newel Eliason
13 items (Children�s Folklore: Games)
No Release Forms

82-051Lauritzen, RuthIn Old Espanol: A Collection of Mexican Jokes
20 items (Jokes: Ethnic - Exoteric)
No Release Forms

82-052Laursen, LisaFolk Games and Dance Songs
11 items (Folk Songs; Ethnic: Namibia, Africa, Danish, Swedish, English, Colorado, U.S. - Text Only, No Score)
No Release Forms

82-053Laursen, LisaThe Personality of Quilting
18 items (Material Culture: Quilts - Photographs Included)
No Release Forms

82-054Mann, KristinPranks Played on Substitute Teachers
21 items (Young Adult Folklore: Pranks - Tape Included, Additional Stories, Not Transcribed)
No Release Forms

82-055Manning, Roger C.Misconceptions of Mormonism
14 items (Religious Lore: LDS)
No Release Forms
Box 1482-056Martin, Wesley D.Legends for Success in the Mountains
9 items (Beliefs and Superstitions: Hunting)
No Release Forms

82-057Martindale, BarbaraFolklore
10 items (Recipes; Toys; Songs; Tall Tales)
No Release Forms: RESTRICTIONS

82-058Martineau, CherylMore Than Just a Blanket
29 items (Material Culture: Quilts - Photographs and Illustrations Included)
No Release Forms

82-059Matthews, Charlene K.The Way They Were
15 items (Family Folklore: History; Legends)
No Release Forms

82-060Mullens, DamaraFolklore of the Silfies Family
17 items (Customs: Holiday; Sayings, Songs)
No Release Forms

82-061McCollum, CindySnow Fairies
12 items (Occupational Lore: Skiing: Customs, Beliefs)
No Release Forms

82-062Nash, JulieFolk Medicines
14 items (Medical Lore: Remedies)
No Release Forms

82-063Nelson, Lori A.Folklore of J. Rulon Nelson Family
12 items (Family Folklore: History; Stories)
No Release Forms

82-064Olsen, William B.Cats, Bats, Bears, and Bolger
15 items (Memorates; Animal Stories)
No Release Forms

82-065Page, Kathy J.Colored Humor: A Look at Ethnic Jokes
44 items
MISSING

82-066Palmer, LisaFolk Medicine and Tradition
10 items (Family Folklore: Folk Remedies; Holiday Traditions: Christmas, Birthdays)
No Release Forms
Box 1582-067Parker, VirginiaChildren's Games and Pastimes
17 items (Games: Counting Out Rhymes - Photocopied Pictures Included)
No Release Forms

82-068Parrish, CynthiaUndating: Folklore of Adolescence
22 items (Young Adult Lore: Dating, Games, Customs, Jokes)
No Release Forms

82-069Pattee, KariSpiritual and Religious or Supernatural
10 items (Religious Folklore: LDS, Supernatural)
No Release Forms

82-070Payne, Shauna A.Herbal Medicine
11 items (Folk Remedies - Glossary of Terms Included)
No Release Forms

82-071Peck, AllesenChristmas Tradition of the Peck Family
11 items (Family Folklore: Holiday Traditions: Christmas)
No Release Forms

82-072Perkins, Terry L.Dormitory Pranks
26 items (College Lore: Pranks)
No Release Forms

82-073Petersen, Reid A.Those Crazy California Hunters
17 items (Regional Lore: Utah: Recreational Lore)
No Release Forms

82-074Peterson, Mary Kay"30 Years of Harmony": The Montpelier Lions Club Trio
19 items (Folk Songs; Regional Lore: Idaho)
No Release Forms

82-075Porter, Kevin L.Folklore
20 items (Regional Lore: Escalante, Utah: Stories, Sayings, Remedies)
No Release Forms

82-076Riddle, CindyFolksay Traditions Within the Riddle Family
12 items (Family Folklore: Sayings)
No Release Forms

82-077Romero, Jerry B.Collection of Ballads, Folklore, and Folksongs
10 items (Regional Lore: Park City, Utah)
No Release Forms
Box 1682-078Roper, MarleneFolktales
17 items (Regional Lore: Oak City, Utah: Legend: �Three Nephites�)
No Release Forms

82-079Sampson, CharlesGetting to Know Mr. Black
10 items (Regional Lore: Cache Valley: Legends: Supernatural, Etiological)
No Release Forms

82-080Smith, Charles P.Mormon Healings
15 items (Religious Lore: LDS: Supernatural)
No Release Forms

82-081Smith, Robert Owen F."Who's There!": Personal and Family Experiences with the Paranormal
16 items (Family Folklore: Legends: Supernatural, Ghost Stories)
No Release Forms

82-082Staheli, Merrill K.Stories, Sayings of Joseph Price
22 items (Character Legends)
No Release Forms

82-083Straford, SharonGirl's Camp Stories
15 items (Regional Lore: Northern Utah: Legends: Humorous Ghost Stories)
No Release Forms

82-084Summers, LoyalLife on the Range
18 items (Occupational Lore: Sheep Herders: Personal Narratives)
No Release Forms

82-085Swain, NanetteFamily Follies and Related Tales
12 items (Family Folklore: Personal Narratives)
No Release Forms

82-086Tadlock, MartinPersonal Folklore of Richmond County, NC
15 items (Regional Lore: Legends, Proverbs, Remedies)
No Release Forms

82-087Taggart, JanJump Rope Rhymes
27 items (Children�s Lore: Rhymes, Games)
No Release Forms

82-088Thatcher, Alan M.Returned Missionary and Dating Folklore
21 items (Personal Narratives; Stereotypes; Jokes)
No Release Forms
Box 1782-089Thow, JonathanCamping Stories
16 items (Legends: Supernatural, Ghost Stories)
No Release Forms

82-090Tobler, LeoPersonal Folklore of Glen Tobler
17 items (Family Folklore: Personal Narratives)
No Release Forms

82-091Trimble, PattyHalloween
10 items (Customs/Traditions)
No Release Forms

82-092Wade, David R.My Family's Lore
15 items (Family Folklore: Personal Narratives, Games, Riddles)
No Release Forms

82-093Wallis, MelanieA Worm's Guide to the Esoteric Language of the Oilfields
7 items (Occupational Lore: Oilfield Workers: Jargon, Initiation Pranks - Glossary and Photographs Included)
No Release Forms

82-094Watson, CrystalSpring City, Utah
49 items (Legends: History, Supernatural: �Three Nephite,� Other Supernatural; Nicknames; Customs; Epitaphs; Architecture - Photographs Included)
No Release Forms

82-095Weeks, KennethEthnic Jokes
45 items (Mormon, Black, Mexican, Jewish, Catholic)
No Release Forms

82-096Welch, JenniferThe Games and Traditions of the Welch Family
10 items (Family Folklore: Traditions, Games)
No Release Forms

82-097Whittier, MargoGames are for Everyone
16 items (Children�s Folklore: Games)
No Release Forms

82-098Williamson, JulieThe Legend of "the Hook"
15 items (Urban Legends: Variations)
No Release Forms

82-099Wright, KlaraSwiss Folklore
16 items (Ethnic Lore; Customs: Holidays, Recipes)
No Release Forms
Box 1882-100Wright, CharlotteThe Wright Way: Stories of the Wright Family
18 items (Family Folklore: Personal Narrative, Courtship, Miraculous Healing)
No Release Forms

82-101Williams, GeorgeCollections of Tall Tales from Enterprise, Utah
15 items (Regional Lore; Legend: Tall Tales)
No Release Forms

82-102Woolston, DebbieFamily Folklore
26 items (Jokes; Personal Narratives; Sayings; Supernatural Stories; Songs; Superstitions)
No Release Forms

82-103Bowler, TerryFolktales of Old Hebron
18 items (Regional Lore: Hebron, Utah: Legends)
No Release Forms

82-104Brown, VikFrisco Folklore
15 items (Regional Lore: Frisco, Utah: Mining)
No Release Forms

82-105Condie, LynnRegional Folklore
21 items (Family Folklore; Toys, Jokes, Legends, Religious Folklore: LDS)
No Release Forms

82-106Funk, FayetteFrom My Piano to Yours...
11 items (Folk Songs - Score and Tape Included)
No Release Forms

82-107Ferguson, RonCollection Assignment
15 items (Family Folklore: Personal Narratives)
No Release Forms

82-108Hansen, RandallSchool Days, School Days
18 items (Children�s Lore: Games, Rhymes, Stories)
No Release Forms

82-109Petersen, ReidA Collection of Sing- A-longs from the Petersen Family
58 items (Folk Songs: Scores)
No Release Forms

82-110Randall, TheronFamily Folklore
22 items (Regional Lore: Enterprise, Utah: Family Lore; History, Games, Remedies)
No Release Forms
Box 1982-111Holland, Carroll (Tom)Gentle Glimpses of the Gentry by the Gentiles of the Escalante Valley
17 items (Regional Lore: Escalante, Utah: Family Folklore)
No Release Forms

82-112Hulet, KathyLegends of the Naming of Towns in Southern Utah
18 items (Regional Lore: Southern Utah: Etiological Lore)
No Release Forms

82-113Jolley, Kenneth S.Stories from Grace Demille Hirschi
16 items (Personal Narratives; Games; Rhymes; Recipe; Folk Remedies; Legends)
No Release Forms

82-114Miller, DouglasHistory and Folklore of Washington, Utah
8 items (Regional Lore: Washington, Utah)
No Release Forms

82-115Thatcher, ElaineGlory, Glory, What�s it to Ya�?
73 items (Folk Songs: Children�s Songs, Parodies, Young Adult Songs)
No Release Forms

82-116Wilson, Susan S.But We�ve Always Done it That Way in Escalante
30 items (Regional Lore: Escalante, Utah: Tales, Naming, Customs, Remedies, Recipes)
No Release Forms

83-001Anderson, TerriSongs of Youth
40 items (Children�s Folklore: Songs)
No Release Forms

83-002Brown, DavidPi Kappa Alpha Fraternity Lore
15 items (College Lore: Fraternities, Songs)
No Release Forms

83-003Brown, GregPersonal Folklore Collections of Greg Brown
19 items (Games; Songs; Sayings)
No Release Forms

83-004Bern, DavidBear Lake Settler's Folklore
11 items (Regional Lore: Bear Lake, Utah: Remedies, Legend, Fences, Homes, Games)
No Release Forms
Box 2083-005Chelikowsky, ScottThe River: Mein Insel Auf Unheimlich Vollmacht
12 items (Legends: Supernatural, Personal Narratives)
No Release Forms

83-006Christensen, ScottInitiation Rites and Pranks -- Past and Present
21 items (Fraternities; High School; LDS Mission)
No Release Forms

83-007Clark, CathleenClark Family Traditions
10 items (Customs; Holidays; Foodways)
No Release Forms

83-008Douglas, SueA View of the Women's Movement Through Folklore
75 items (Jokes; Newspaper Articles)
No Release Forms

83-009Douglass, James B.Big Foot Stories
13 items (Legends)
No Release Forms

83-010Eastmond, Daniel V.Food Related Practical Jokes
44 items (Practical Jokes/ Pranks)
No Release Forms

83-011Fryer, LynnetteLegends About and Experiences with Kaye's Cross
19 items (Regional Lore: Kaysville, Utah: Legend Tripping Narratives)
No Release Forms

83-012Gillies, AlisonSuperstitions
11 items (Superstitions: Luck)
No Release Forms

83-013Goodrich, SherylHoliday Customs
10 items (Family Lore: Birthdays, Valentine�s Day, Easter, Independence Day, Christmas, Recipes, Song)
No Release Forms

83-014Hansen, Susan H.Pregnancy and New Baby Lore
44 items (Superstitions; Personal Narratives)
No Release Forms
Box 2183-015Hedin, Monty H.Hunting and Fishing Lore
15 items (Occupational Lore: Customs, Jokes, Tall Tales)
No Release Forms

83-016Hobbs, KathrynChildren's Folklore
39 items (Jokes; Rhymes; Songs)
No Release Forms

83-017Ibach, Anna M.�Say What?�: Roommate Lore
21 items (Sayings: Wisecracks/ Insults, Excuses)
No Release Forms

83-018Jarrett, LisaGames Played by Children
10 items (Playground Games - Illustrations Included)
No Release Forms

83-019Jensen, SuzanneBeliefs of the Wright Family
10 items (Folk Beliefs)
No Release Forms

83-020Kartchner, MarleneSongs My Mother Sang in Grade School
21 items (Children�s Folklore: Songs)
No Release Forms

83-021Keller, Terri AnnHaunts of Bridgerland
13 items (Legends: Supernatural, Ghost Stories)
No Release Forms

83-022Klumps, CherylJournalistic Lore
11 items (Occupational Lore: Journalism: Personal Narratives)
No Release Forms

83-023Kulsic, VictoriaBert and I and Other Tales from Maine
19 items (Regional Lore: Maine: Character Legends)
No Release Forms

83-024Larsen, Carolyn CowanFamily Habit Traditions
10 items (Family Folklore: Traditions, Holiday Customs)
No Release Forms

83-025Mendenhall, MartinChristmas Traditions: Swenson Family
10 items (Family Lore: Holiday Customs)
No Release Forms

83-026Neilson, TrudyFolk Belief from Egin, Idaho
39 items (Folk Remedies; Superstitions: Weather, Luck)
No Release Forms
Box 2283-027Newhall, Maurine S.Camp Initiation Folklore
10 items (Young Adult Lore: Initiations, Pranks)
No Release Forms

83-028Olsen, SuzanPlace Names in Star Valley, WY
18 items (Etiological Lore: Naming Legends)
No Release Forms

83-029Price, DougHumorous Highlights of the Four Letter Word G*O*L*F
9 item. (Occupational Lore: Golfers: Jokes)
No Release Forms

83-030Peterson, Mary KayChild Abduction Stories
25 items (Memorates)
No Release Forms

83-031Pond, LarryJokes Told by East Coast Elders
32 items (Jokes: BYU Co-Ed, Religious, Racial)
No Release Forms

83-032Singler, MarjorieThe Basque
10 items (Ethnic Lore: Proverbs, Superstitions, Jokes)
No Release Forms

83-033Shannon, CharlieEncounters with the Law
22 items (Memorates; Personal Narratives)
No Release Forms

83-034Smith, PeytonSuperstition Folklore
44 items (Superstitions: Luck, Health)
No Release Forms

83-035Spackman, ToniThe Historical Folklore of Honeyville, Utah
31 items (Regional Lore: Honeyville, Utah: Legends, Recipes, Architecture - Photographs Included)
No Release Forms

83-036Whitaker, SusanMy Family's Holiday Customs
12 items (Family Folklore: Calendrical Holidays: Birthdays, Christmas)
No Release Forms

83-037Whittern, AlanPregnancy Lore Among LDS Women
32 items (Human Condition: Superstitions)
No Release Forms
Box 2383-038Wilson, Terie KayChildhood Games of My College Friends
10 items (Children�s Folklore: Games)
No Release Forms

83-039Worthington, John P.Logan's Lyric Ghost Legends
25 items (Legends: Ghost Stories - Photographs of Theater Included)
No Release Forms

83-040Young, David G.American Bearlore
34 items (Customs; Sayings; Material Culture: Teddy Bears)
No Release Forms

83-041Davis, ThayaJump Rope Rhymes
30 items (Children�s Lore)
No Release Forms

83-042Hone, MatthewBYU Co-Ed Jokes Told at USU
11 items (College Lore: Jokes)
No Release Forms

83-043Crockett, CraigNight Games: Games Played by Children in the Evening
10 items (Children�s Lore: Games)
No Release Forms

83-044Strong, Susan VeeThe Folklore of Clear Creek Summer Camp
9 items (Legends; Personal Narratives; Jokes)
No Release Forms

83-045Holm, RichardContact Folk Medicine
20 items (Folk Remedies)
No Release Forms

83-046Bradford, LynneChildhood Games Played in Blanding, Utah
10 items (Children�s Lore: Games)
No Release Forms

83-047Walters, KurtSelected Tombstone Epitaphs of Beaver Dam and Wellsville Cemeteries
18 items (Cemetery Lore; Epitaphs)
No Release Forms

84-001Alder, Elise M.Spiritual Memorates and Folklore of Pearl O. Fowler: A Gem In More Than Name
14 items (Personal Narratives; Religious Lore: LDS)
No Release Forms
Box 2484-002Baker, Robert S.Death and Burial Lore: Collected from East Texas and Western Louisiana
12 items (Customs; Superstitions)
No Release Forms

84-003Banks, JeannieFolklore of Sweatshirts
16 items (Material Culture - 17 Slides)
No Release Forms

84-004Bartlett, RobPractical Jokes
15 items (Practical Jokes: Missionary; Telephone)
No Release Forms

84-005Bartlett, RobEvil Encounters with Missionaries
12 items (Religious Lore: Urban Legends: Supernatural Encounters)
No Release Forms

84-006Blair, BobLaughter: The Best Medicine
20 items (Medical Lore: Humorous Stories/Jokes)
No Release Forms

84-007Blair, DellThe End: An LDS Accounting of the Last Days
21 items (Personal Narratives; Urban Legends; Religious Lore: End of Earth)
No Release Forms

84-008Bundy, MarjorieStories Told Around the Campfire at Bundy Reunions
40 items (Family Folklore: Legends: Spiritual, Supernatural, Personal Narratives)
No Release Forms

84-009Bundy, MarjorieStories Told Around the Campfire at the Bundy Reunion, Part II
47 items (Family Folklore: Legends: Spiritual, Supernatural; Personal Narratives)
No Release Forms

84-010Canfield, LisaCanfield Family Folklore
16 items (Traditions: Christmas, Songs, Personal Narratives)
No Release Forms

84-011Carlisle, ColleenFoodlore
24 items (Foodways: Recipes, Holidays)
No Release Forms

84-012Christofferson, CarolineFamily Potpourri
16 items (Family Folklore: Personal Narratives)
No Release Forms
Box 2584-013Cluff, MichaelFamily Songs
13 items (Folk Songs - Scores Included)
No Release Forms

84-014Cooper, BetsyOccupational Ski-Lore
18 items (Personal Narratives; Games; Naming Lore)
No Release Forms

84-015Curtis, Leslie MillerCatherine Gwennie Matheson Miller and George Cottam Miller Sr.
12 items (Family Folklore: Personal Narratives)
No Release Forms

84-016Earl, Gloria T.Mormon Burial Folklore
14 items (Death Lore: Personal Narratives)
No Release Forms

84-017Floyd, BradCar Games
16 items (Games)
No Release Forms

84-018Gjerdahl, Kristin LeeMy Family Folklore
30 items (Family Folklore: History; Ethnic Folklore: Norwegian; Material Culture; Foodways; Customs; Sayings - Photographs Included)
No Release Forms

84-019Green, David L.The Salesman � Taking Advantage
35 items (Occupational Lore: Sales: Customs, Jargon)
No Release Forms

84-020Griffin Sue Lyn B.Stories from the Teton Flood Disaster
15 items (Regional Lore: Sugar City, Idaho: Personal Narratives)
No Release Forms

84-021Gwamma, Samuel M.Traditional Folktales and Culture
10 items (Regional Lore: Nigeria: Folktales)
No Release Forms

84-022Hardy, CherieThe Weirdest Two Years of My Life
15 items (Religious Lore: LDS Missionary: Personal Narratives, Jokes)
No Release Forms
Box 2684-023Hilding, TinaHilding Family Folklore
28 items (History; Legends; Holiday Traditions; Sayings)
No Release Forms

84-024Hunt, LisaSpecial Occasion Food Ways
12 items (Food Ways: Recipes)
No Release Forms

84-025Ivie, Randy B.The Bear Lake Monster
15 items (Regional Lore: Bear Lake, Utah: Urban Legends)
No Release Forms

84-026Ivie, Randy B.Christmas Traditions
15 items (Calendrical Holidays)
No Release Forms

84-027Johnson, Kathryn E.R.Gory Stories Ninth Graders Tell
35 items (Urban Legends �The Hook,� �Weeping Woman,� etc.)
No Release Forms

84-028Keen, Howard G.Folk Medicine
19 items (Folk Remedies)
No Release Forms

84-029Kelley, Lois J.On Being Female: The Folklore of Female Mormon Missionaries
19 items (Religious Lore: LDS Missionary, Personal Narratives)
No Release Forms

84-030Klomps, MaryBee Lore
13 items (Occupational Lore: Bee Researchers: Initiation, Games, Customs)
No Release Forms

84-031Larkin, ScottLas Vegas: City of Sin
19 items (Regional Lore: Las Vegas, Nevada: Personal Narratives)
No Release Forms

84-032Larsen, AnnetteFolk Crafts in My Family
26 items (Material Culture: Quilting/Knitting; Sewing; Customs - Photographs Included)
No Release Forms
Box 2784-033LeFeure, JeannetteLegends, Folktales, and Customs of the Chinese People
15 items (Ethnic/Regional Lore: China)
No Release Forms

84-034Lundberg, Jim F.The Mission Training Center Folklore
23 items (Religious Lore: LDS Missionary; Customs)
No Release Forms

84-035Malicka, AgnieszkaFolk Traditions
9 items (Ethnic/Regional Lore: Poland - Handwritten)
No Release Forms

84-036Marshall, Dorothy F.Some Mormon Midwife Practices
20 items (Customs, Beliefs: Pregnancy/Childbirth)
No Release Forms

84-037Mitchell, TimTrain Up a Child: The Influence of Family Folklore
15 items (Family Folklore: History)
No Release Forms

84-038Morris, DeborahSpiritual Assistance in Genealogy and Temple Work
28 items (Religious Lore: LDS: Personal Narrative, Legend)
No Release Forms

84-039McCracken, Stephen C.German-Speaking Immigrants Living in Cache Valley
15 items (Ethnic Lore: German)
No Release Forms

84-040McDonald, JanettFamily Folklore: McDonald
19 items (Holiday Customs; Personal Narratives)
No Release Forms

84-041McNeill, Lora"To The Future"
57 items (Family Folklore: Traditions/Customs)
No Release Forms

84-042North, SheriThe Occupational Folklore in Flying
24 items (Legends; Jargon; Proverbs)
No Release Forms
Box 2884-043Onderdonk, MarkCures for the Hiccups
20 items (Folk Remedies)
No Release Forms

84-044Page, DanielBleeps and Bloopers by Spanish Speaking Missionaries
30 items (Religious Lore: LDS Missionary; Personal Narrative)
No Release Forms

84-045Peterson, Kirk K.Folklore Games of Children and Young Adults
10 items (Children�s Lore: Games)
No Release Forms

84-046Ririe, TereseRebellion in the Gotteborg, Sweden Mission
23 items (Religious Lore: LDS Missionary; Personal Narrative)
No Release Forms

84-047Robbins, Patricia B.Collett Family Folklore
24 items (History; Remedies; Recipes; Songs; Material Culture: Fences,
Handwork, Furniture - Photographs Included)
No Release Forms

84-048Robbins, Ruth AnnFolklore from the Charles Pennington Robbins Family
36 items (History; Remedies; Proverbs; Furniture)
No Release Forms

84-049Sellers, GwenMissionary Jargon
8 items (Verbal Lore)
No Release Forms

84-050Shaw, Sandra L.Legends of St. Anne's Retreat
15 items (Regional Lore: Cache Valley: Urban Legends; Legend Tripping)
No Release Forms

84-051Smith, KayPolygamous Stories in American Folklore
12 items (Religious Lore: Attitudes About Polygamy)
No Release Forms

84-052Steed, LeesaConversion Stories
10 items (Religious Lore: LDS: Personal Narratives)
No Release Forms
Box 2984-053Stephens, Doug R.Counting-Out Rhyme Games
27 items (Children�s Folklore)
No Release Forms

84-054Stephens, Doug R.Stephens and Montgomery Family Folklore
20 items (History; Personal Narratives)
No Release Forms

84-055Stringham, MargeneFamily Christmas Traditions Within 3 Generations of One Utah Family
33 items (Family Folklore: Customs, Holiday)
No Release Forms

84-056Stuart, Gary T.Legends of Lost Mines and Hidden Treasures
16 items (Occupational Lore: Legends)
No Release Forms

84-057Summers, LoyalTimes Were Different Then
15 items (Family Folklore: Personal Narratives - Photocopied Pictures Included)
No Release Forms

84-058Thow, JonathanThe Jones Family Legends
23 items (Family Folklore: History, Legends)
No Release Forms

84-059Traylor, BobThe Eyes of Texas are Upon You
24 items (Regional Lore: Festivals, Sayings, Remedies)
No Release Forms

84-060Truitt, Ester RuthFolklore Abroad
25 items (Regional Lore: China, England, France, Germany, Greece, India, Israel, Italy, Japan, Nepal, Russia, Sri Lanka, Turkey - Tape and Photographs Included)
No Release Forms

84-061Wightman, ToddThe Haunted House
10 items (Legend Tripping Narratives)
No Release Forms
Box 3084-062Wilding, LaurieDormitory Practical Jokes
15 items (College Lore: Jokes)
No Release Forms

84-063Williams, NancyKeeping the Faith: Catholics in Cache Valley
23 items (Religious Lore: Catholicism, Traditions, Narratives)
No Release Forms

85-001Abbott, Clifford LeeGrandma and Stories from the Life of Leona Thompson
10 items (Family Folklore: Personal Narratives)
Release Forms Included

85-002Allen, Kristine H.Jokes About Mormons Told by Non-Mormons
21 items (Jokes: Exoteric Religious Lore)
Collector Release Form Included

85-003Anderson, Lance B.Anderlore
10 items (Family Folklore: Personal Narratives)
Collector Release Form Included

85-004Anderson, RandyChristmas Traditions and Decorations
10 items (Calendrical Holidays: Traditions - Illustrations and Slides)
Release Forms Included

85-005Cannon, Steven B.Classroom Tales of Richard Bradford
19 items (Personal Narratives; Practical Jokes)
Release Forms Included

85-006Davis, StevenFolk Remedies
34 items (Medicinal Lore: Wart Remedies, Cold Remedies, Other)
Release Forms Included

85-007Hansen, Helen U.Family Thanksgiving Customs and Traditions of Twelve People
12 items (Calendrical Holidays: Customs)
Release Forms Included

85-008Hilgenberg, PatriciaDental Folklore
12 items (Occupational Lore: Remedies)
Collector Release Form Included
Box 3185-009Hinton, StephenTraditional Dutch Foods
10 items (Regional Lore: Holland: Food Ways: Recipes)
Release Forms Included

85-010Ipson, Parley V.Hunting Lore
19 items (Occupational Lore: Personal Narratives)
Release Forms Included

85-011Malan, SusanneOld Time Remedies
19 items (Medical Lore)
Release Forms Included

85-012McKay, RebeccaHuntsville Stories
18 items (Regional Lore: Huntsville, Utah - Tape Included)
Collector Release Form Included

85-013Monson, Richard A.The Legend of Old Ephraim, the Bear of Utah
6 items (Regional Lore: Utah: Legends)
No Release Forms

85-014Nielsen, StacyFlying Home in a Washtub and Other Stories of Faith
15 items (Religious Lore: LDS: Personal Narratives, �Three Nephite Legends�)
Release Forms Included

85-015Rogers, KarletteThe Building of Christmas Memories Through Traditions and Personal Anecdotes
17 items (Family Lore: Calendrical Holidays: Traditions, Personal Narrative)
Release Forms Included

85-016Saunders, RichardEntertainment in Boy Scout Troop 262, Corvallis, OR
23 items (Children�s Lore: Songs, Games)
Release Forms Included

85-017Simon, J.R.The Ancient Trade of Coopering
17 items (Occupational Lore: Cooper)
Release Forms Included

85-018Stewart, Maryanne�Wrapping� with White Water Rafters
11 items (Occupational Lore: River Rafting Guides - Tape Included)
Release Forms Included
Box 3285-019 Winfield, RonaldHispanic and Black Jokes
23 items (Racial Jokes)
Release Forms Included

86-001Anderson, RandyMormon Missionary Stories
13 items (Religious Lore: LDS Missionary, Personal Narratives)
Release Forms Included: RESTRICTIONS

86-002Argyle, Todd J.Pranks of L.D.S. Missionaries in Japan
9 items (Missionary: Pranks)
Release Forms Included

86-003Bentley, RobPopular Mission Stories
14 items (LDS Missionary Lore: Pranks, Personal Narratives)
Release Forms Included

86-004Bilodeau, BrendaSupernatural Religious Stories Relating to the Church of
Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

11 items (Religious Lore: LDS: Supernatural)
Release Forms Included

86-005Blaylock, Mary J.Folklore from a South Korean Mission
11 items (LDS Missionary Lore: Personal Narratives)
Collector Release Form Included

86-006Blockinger, CynthiaChi Omega Candle Passings: Songs and Customs
9 items (College Lore: Sororities: Songs, Customs - Tape Included)
Release Forms Included

86-007Bowden, AleneAWOL Missionaries and Other Missionary Stories
12 items (LDS Missionary Lore: Urban Legends)
Release Forms Included

86-008Briscoe, JonStories of Missionaries Being Protected
13 items (LDS Missionary Lore: Personal Narratives)
Release Forms Included

86-009Butler, LisaFolk Music of the Butler Family Generations
7 items (Family Folklore: Songs)
Release Forms Included
Box 3386-010Bylsma, LisaQuilts of Three Generations
8 items (Material Culture: Quilts)
Release Forms Included

86-011Cahoon, CarolSongs of My Heritage and Parowan
17 items (Regional Lore: Parowan, Utah: Songs - Scores)
Release Forms Included

86-012Carney, Todd F.Chalk Markings on Railroad Cars
40 items (Written Lore: Graffiti - Photographs)
Release Forms Included

86-013Carney, Todd F.Railroad Workers' Nicknames in California
24 items (Occupational Lore: Rail Road: Etiological Lore: Nicknames)
Release Forms Included

86-014Carter, Clayton S.Differences in Holiday Folklore
6 items (Calendrical Holidays: Halloween, Thanksgiving, Christmas)
Release Form Included

86-015Cheney, ScottSanpete County Epitaphs: A Look Into the Beliefs of the Pioneers
18 items (Cemetery Lore: Epitaphs)
Release Forms Included

86-016Clark, LaDean S.Listen What the Children Say
8 items (Children�s Lore: Songs - Tape Included)
Collector Release Form Included

86-017Crossland, LesliePaper Airplanes as Folk Art
9 items (Material Culture - Folded Paper Planes Included)
Collector Release Form Included

86-018Crossland, Sarah C.Underground Mining Folklore of the Western U.S.
6 items (Occupational Lore: Miners)
Release Forms Included
Box 3486-019Drage, DianaFamily Spiritual Experiences
13 items (Family Folklore: Personal Narratives)
No Release Forms

86-020Easterling, PatrickJokes from the Briar
35 items (Jokes: Racial)
Collector Release Form Included

86-021Egan, Maria JaneIt's Hard to be Green
15 items (LDS Missionary Lore: Personal Narratives)
Release Forms Included

86-022 Erekson, Edward A.Santa Claus
11 items (Character Legends: Personal Narratives)
Release Forms Included

86-023Erickson, Ralph L.Ballads and Folksongs
27 items (Folksongs and Ballads: Children�s Rhymes - Tape Included)
Collector Release Form Included

86-024Esplin, LyleTruck Driver Jokes
16 items (Occupational Lore: Truck Driver: Jokes)
Release Forms Included

86-025Gibby, Kristina C.Danish Folklore
5 items (Family Folklore: History)
Collector Release Form Included

86-026Gilmore, Thaya E.Legends of Cache Valley
15 items (Regional Lore: Legends: Urban Legends, Legend Tripping Narratives)
Release Forms Included

86-027Godfrey, Shauna M.The Matson Family Reunion
26 items (Family Folklore: Personal Narratives, Traditions)
Release Forms Included: RESTRICTIONS

86-028Goold, JulieCollection of Mormon Jokes
14 items (Jokes: BYU Co-Ed, Mormon)
Release Forms Included
Box 3586-029Gordon, Hal W.A Collection of Mormon Missionary �Xerox� Lore -
Missionary Letters, Notes, and Songs

21 items (Missionary Lore: Material Culture - Photocopies Included)
Collector Release Form Included

86-030Hackford, WaltScottish Mission Lore and Levity
12 items (LDS Missionary Lore: Games, Initiation)
Release Forms Included

86-031Holford, Kenneth W.Vanishing America
50 items (Regional Lore: Cache Valley: Legend: Big Ephraim; Material Culture: Architecture: Pioneer Homes, Grain Elevators, Outhouses, Windmills, Barns, Farm Machinery - Photographs Included)
Collector Release Form Included

86-032Holford, Kenneth W.Folk and Campfire Stories
1 item (Published Booklet of Stories: Camp Legends)
Release Forms Included

86-033Holm, Tara LeeStories of George Sant, Sr.
9 items (Family Folklore: History)
Release Forms Included

86-034Hood, MichelleMormon Stories of the Supernatural
11 items (Religious Lore: LDS: Supernatural)
Release Forms Included

86-035Johnson, JessHoliday Customs and Family Traditions
10 items (Family Lore: Customs, Calendrical Lore)
Release Forms Included

86-036Jolley, AlendaSauerkraut in Providence
5 items (Regional Lore: Providence, Utah: Foodways)
Release Forms Included

86-037Jones, ChristopherHay Derricks of Southern Cache Valley
9 items (Regional Lore: Material Culture)
Collector Release Form Included
Box 3686-038LaRocco, CraigBoy Scouts and Their Campfire Tales
21 items (Children�s Lore; Camp Legends, Urban Legends)
Release Forms Included

86-039Lyman, Patricia B.Family
14 items (Songs - Scores, Tape Included)
Release Forms Included

86-040Madsen, TammyChildren's Folklore
50 items (Games; Songs; Chants)
Release Forms Included

86-041Magnotto, John C.Grateful Dead Folk Group
5 items (Customs)
Collector Release Form Included

86-042Malan, SusanneCamp Songs
13 items (Young Adult Lore - Tape Included)
Release Forms Included

86-043Maughan, David S.The Folklore of Science Fiction
15 items (Customs; Songs)
No Release Form - permission given in cover essay

86-044Maughan, Kim M.My Ozark Granny
25 items (Family Folklore: Traditions)
Collector Release Form Included

86-045Monson, CatherineMormon Folklore
11 items (Religious Lore: LDS: Legends: Supernatural)
Release Forms Included: RESTRICTIONS

86-046Monson, Ian K.Mormon Temple Folklore
11 items (Religious Lore: LDS: Legends: Supernatural)
Release Forms Included: RESTRICTIONS
Box 3786-047Morris, DeborahDress It Right and Cover Down: A Collection of Military Cadences
15 items (Occupational Lore: Military - Tape Included)
Release Forms Included

86-048Morris, DeborahSongs My Parents Gave Me: Two Generations of Parent-Taught Folk Songs
9 items (Folksongs - Tape Included)
Release Forms Included

86-049Otteson, GwenCampfire Legends
13 items (Urban Legends)
Release Forms Included

86-050Pearce, KathleenMormon Missionaries: A Strange Breed
20 items (Religious Lore: Personal Narratives)
Release Forms Included

86-051Pimentel, Ursula M.Folk Expressions in the Context of a Family History:
Life on a Small North German Farm

42 items (Regional Lore: Germany: Family Folklore: History)
Release Forms Included

86-052Reed, PatriciaReed Family Folklore: Past to Present
16 items (Family Folklore: History, Personal Narratives)
Release Forms Included: RESTRICTIONS

86-053Reevs, Lila FernFolklore of New Mexico
11 items (Regional Lore: New Mexico: Jokes, Remedies, Stories)
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86-054Rhoe, KelleyMedical Legends
4 items (Occupational Lore: Medicine)
Release Forms Included

86-055Rogers, KarletteCamp Songs With Actions
8 items (Folksongs - Videotape MISSING)
Box 3886-056Scherting, Mark A.Beaver Mountain's Roots
20 items (Occupational Lore: Skiers - Photographs Included)
Collector Release Form Included

86-057Shields, KevinShields' Family Folksongs
14 items (Family Folklore: Songs, Ballads)
Collector Release Form Included

86-058Siler, JimEspecially for Mormon Teachers
27 items (Religious Folklore: LDS: Spiritual Stories)
Release Forms Included: RESTRICTIONS

86-059Simon, James R.N.A.S.A. Jokes About the Shuttle Challenger
19 items (Jokes)
Release Forms Included

86-060Spencer, John R.Stories of the Logan Temple
1 item (Religious Lore: LDS: Legend)
Collector Release Form Included

86-061Steadman, A. CoePranks in Medical School and Residency
10 items (Occupational Lore: Medicine: Pranks)
Release Forms Included

86-062Stewart, MaryanneFamily Ties Through Traditional Song
28 items (Family Folklore: Songs - Three Tapes Included )
Release Forms Included

86-063Stringham, MargeneStringham Family Songs and Camp Songs
20 items (Family Folklore: Songs, Camp Songs - Scores Included)
Release Forms Included

86-064Sweeney, MichelleFarm Stories: People and the Lifestyle Involved


Family folklore is the branch of folkloristics concerned with the study and use of folklore and traditional culture transmitted within a family group. This includes items of material culture, crafts produced by family members or memorabilia saved as reminders or remainders of significant family events. It also includes family photos and photo albums in paper and electronic format, along with bundles of other pages held for posterity: certificates, letters, journals, notes and shopping lists. Family stories and sayings, originally recounting actual events, are told and retold until the historical facts give way to a distilled expression of common identity. Family customs are performed, modified, forgotten, created or resurrected with alarming frequency; each time with the goal of defining and solidifying the perception of this family as unique, distinct and different from other families.

Family folklore has long been included in the documentation of the folklore of regional, ethnic, religious or occupational groups.[1] It is only since the 1970s that this lore has also been investigated as a defining element of the family group itself. Heralded by a call from Mody Boatright to document the "family saga" in 1958,[2] folklorists responded with published accounts of stories and traditions passed down in their own families.[3] L. Karen Baldwin’s unpublished dissertation (1975)[4] laid further theoretical groundwork for family folklore "… not only is the family a folk group, it is the first folk group anyone belongs to."[5]

The field has since blossomed, broadening to include an ever expanding understanding of family. The conventional extended family, consisting of a heterosexual married couple with children and grandparents now incorporates gay partners, unmarried committed relationships and children adopted or born through non-traditional methods and procedures. The family traditions themselves are transformed to meet the needs and expectations of these new members and new relationships.

The study of family folklore is distinct from family genealogy or family history. Instead of focusing on historical dates, locations and verifiable events, its unique stories, customs and handicrafts identify the family as a distinct social group. At the same time, the family lore passed along has been molded and transformed to relay a sense of family identity and set of values both within and without the family group. The family lore defines the family story.

For an individual family, folklore is its creative expression of a common past. As raw experiences are transformed into family stories, expression, and photos, they are codified in forms which can easily be recalled, retold, and enjoyed. Their drama and beauty are heightened, and the family’s past becomes accessible as it is reshaped according to its needs and desires. … Its stories, photographs, and traditions are personalized and often creative distillations of experience, worked and reworked over time.[6]

Family as a folk group[edit]

A new baby is born or a child is adopted into an established family group, which contains a microcosm of social alignments found in many larger groups: the vertical relationship between grandparents and grandchildren, the horizontal relationship between siblings and cousins of a generation or age group, clusters of girls or boys and skill-based family alliances.[7][8] The child grows up in this family, sees and learns the family lore as it is performed throughout the seasons and the life cycle. Not only is the family the first folk group of the child, it is "the group in which important primary folkloric socialization takes place and individual aesthetic preference patterns for folkloric exchange are set."[1]

The dynamics of family folklore remain unsettled not only through the addition of newborns and adoptions, but more particularly by the regular incorporation of new adult family members through each marriage or committed relationship. In the formation of each new family node, a unique subset and combination of the customs and traditions of both families is incorporated into a new story, both modifying and enriching the current family lore.

As part of the ongoing national discussion of "family" and what it means, family folklore redefines itself as well. Along with the classic family "father-mother-child(ren)", it expands to include single-parent families, blended families, communes, gay and lesbian families. The indicator for family now includes any group which self-identifies as a family based on intimacy, shared space and shared history. Any collection of adults and children in a committed relationship which sees itself as "us", unique and separate from other families, will develop and transmit stories and customs which are unique. Non-traditional families frequently strive to re-establish and re-enact traditional family customs and lore. This becomes a demonstration both to themselves and to outsiders that they are indeed a family of "tradition".

Transmission[edit]

The transmission of individual stories and customs within a family depends for the most part upon the personality, character, and lifestyle of individual family members. It is not normally passed along as part of a defined family role. As a family reshapes itself around each birth, death, marriage and other life events, individual members elect to pick up items of family lore to own and perform. This might be learning a skill, telling a story (or story cycle) or baking a traditional pie for the Thanksgiving table. The transmission of individual items can picked up by several different family members, for example when several grown siblings use a family recipe or tradition in their own households. This type of transmission through multiple individuals was first described in an article by Dégh and Vázsonyi as "multi-conduit transmission".[9] By choosing to own a piece of the family lore, a family member signifies that this tradition embodies beliefs and values to which he adheres. By successfully transmitting it further within the family, these beliefs and values come to define the family.

There are multiple spheres within the family and household which are "traditionally" defined as in the purview of one gender or the other, making an intersection with gender studies manifest. The transmission of the folklore in these areas will run through either the male or the female lines. An obvious area of gender-related transmission is seen in the kitchen, where food preparation and mealtime customs and forms are generally performed by the women. They are then transmitted from mother to daughter in the course of everyday meal preparation. A variant of this is seen when a man in the family has taken over the preparation of a special meal or special recipe. One common example of this practice is described by Thomas Adler in the article "Making Pancakes on Sunday: The Male Cook in Family Tradition".[10] Many families have some variation of this tradition: the BBQ ribs, grilled hamburgers, or deep-fat fried turkey prepared as a single specialty by the non-cook in the family.

A different gender-related variation in folklore transmission is seen in storytelling. The same story will be shaped and told differently by a man and a woman, even though they were both present at the original event. For an event occurring during the apple harvest, a woman’s narration might include details of the apple butter recipe they were cooking up at the time. In contrast, the man's narration gives only enough detail to "make a point worth telling". This gender-based variance has been studied by both Baldwin and Margaret Yocum within individual family groups. They found "… women's telling to be more collaborative, interruptible, and filled with information and genealogy; men's telling, by contrast, is often uninterrupted and more competitive."[11]

Within families, there is also a notable tendency toward traditional deference where one family member becomes the designated performer for a specific custom or tradition, even though it is known to everyone within the family group. So it happens that when the "last basketmaker" dies, another member will step up to become "the last basketmaker".[7] No one else performs this tradition as long as the designated tradition bearer is available, acknowledging this individual as the (current) keeper of this tradition. Only when this person is no longer available will the tradition be picked up by someone else to carry forward. "Traditional deference" can be found in many folk groups, but is particularly evident within the family group.

Detritus of family lore[edit]

If the family lore which is picked up and transmitted represents the chosen familial beliefs and values, then family stories, documents and photographs which do not support and enhance these values become problematic. For the most part news clipping on arrests, photographs of the uncle who deserted the family, stories of a sister who cheated, or dishonorable discharge papers will not be saved. That is not the family story this family wants to preserve.

Family traditions are also lost or modified in response to difficult events within the family. This is obvious when one of the tradition bearers has died. If no one else steps up to own that tradition, a hole is left in the celebration and this tradition is lost. In a divorce there is also frequently the loss of a parent no longer available to play his or her role in the established traditions. In response to this event, one family decided to change the traditions. The customary tall Christmas tree decorated by the (missing) tall father was traded in for a short tree which the children could decorate. Ornaments were discarded and new ones purchased. The toy train was no longer set up.[12] These became the new traditions for the Christmas celebration, modified to support and tell the new family story.

Another reason family folklore might be suppressed or lost is when the references are too painful at the present time or to the present generation. When Catherine Noren found photo albums and other old family portraits in her grandmother’s attic, she unwittingly unearthed an entire family history of a prosperous German-Jewish family before the Holocaust. It became her task, one generation removed, to explore and record the family history in a book containing photos, diaries and memories of her family history.[13] It is only because these albums and portraits had not been discarded along with the narrative that Noren came to know her family story.

Forms[edit]

It is only since the 1970s that family folklore has been investigated as a defining element of the family group itself. As part of this investigation, the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in Washington, D.C. set up a tent for several years[14] to collect the family lore of visitors to the Festival. The goal was to establish an archive of family folklore as part of the Smithsonian collections. Using the taped interviews collected, representative pieces have been published in the book A Celebration of American Family Folklore: Tales and Traditions from the Smithsonian Collection.[6] Despite its lack of performance data, this collection provides a solid overview of the wide range of family folklore forms.

Family stories and sayings[edit]

A family story initially recounts an actual historical event concerning named family members. Seasoned with time and re-telling, the story gets revised and honed to express specific values and character traits valued in the family. Instead of historical accuracies, the narration becomes a medium to re-state and re-enforce shared values of the family group. These stories generally take the form of an anecdote and follow the pattern of many common traditional tales.[15] A favorite family story involves how the parents met, or how they decided on the one true partner among several. In one family, if the story is to be believed, the prospective bride had to untie all the knots in the string to demonstrate her care and diligence.[16] Another family tells how the young couple got stuck at the top of a Ferris wheel when he proposed, and she had to either say yes or jump.[17] Given time and repetition, the anecdotes serve to shape the family story as a whole, populating it with real individuals and historical events made personal. In their transmission, these stories serve to codify the norms of behavior within the family.

The setting for telling family stories becomes part of the tradition. It can include the family occasions where stories are told, the location and prompt for the storytelling, the family members who initiate the session as well as the designated raconteurs and custodians of the stories. Each of these elements needs to be documented along with the stories themselves as an integral part of the storytelling tradition within this family. In one family following the holiday meal, the men would retire to the study and the women would move into the kitchen. At some point in the cleanup, usually after the best dishes had been washed and put away, the mother would bring out a bottle of schnapps to help complete the work. This became the trigger for family stories and jokes, the laughter from the kitchen frequently bringing the men to join in the storytelling.[18]

Another type of verbal lore common within family groups is the unique family expression or saying. A saying can be created at any time; it starts as a one-time utterance of a family member to capture a single moment. Through repetition, this then becomes a shorthand reference to both the original and the current situation. In one family, the saying "… good worker, very strong" signifies that the speaker wants to come along, and would in fact be a value-add to the planned undertaking. This expression originally referenced a first move of the family, a move that current family members took no part in.[19] Even so, the saying has become code words for all family members, used to communicate encrypted commentary on the present as well as re-enforce and strengthen the family’s shared experience and history.[20]

Photos, letters, journals and other papers[edit]

Papers stacked, bundled or boxed: news clippings, photographs, letters, scrawled notes, journals, receipts. These pages of family artifacts take many forms, and have become a significant part of family archival materials. Frequently jumbled together in cardboard boxes, they commonly pose a problem as to their value-add to the family story. The boxes are passed along until they are either thrown out in a move, destroyed in a fire, or find an owner within the family,[9] someone with the interest and time to house and evaluate them.

The largest collection of papers is frequently the photographs, either kept in a drawer or labeled and organized into albums. Singly each photo documents only a single moment; taken together they comprise an important visual history of the family. Either way, they serve as triggers for more extensive memories, stories and events in the life of this family. They are brought out at gatherings and used to commemorate lifetime events such as a wedding or funeral.

Noteworthy is the consistency in which American families of all ethnic backgrounds tend to have photographs of the same milestones. Naked babies on carpets or in the wading pool, the first day of school, the birthday cake surrounded by family and guests, generational portraits gathered around the new baby can be found in many family albums.[21] This pictorial repetition by American families of all backgrounds and traditions documents the universality of family photography as an important custom.

As with storytelling, the occasion for photo-taking becomes a family tradition in and of itself. Year after year, the same pictures are snapped; documenting a family which is growing and changing, adding and subtracting members, detailing a new location. The camera can be as much a part of the celebration as the birthday cake or the menorah.

The ubiquity of cameras and on-line photos since the rise of cellphone cameras and personal websites is actively changing the tradition of family photos and photo albums. The availability of video recordings and teleconferencing allows for a daily log of family growth and minutiae to be saved and transmitted to family near and far, in real time. Grandparents can get a daily or weekly update on children's growth or milestone events. Family members can video-conference with each other, making geographic distance much less significant in family relations. A new family custom, using the technology of today, is to put together a slideshow or video documenting the story leading up to the current celebration. At this time a folklorist can only speculate on evolving customs of family photography.

Some families have also amassed over decades a collection of letters and other papers written by or about family members. One family, in sorting through boxes of papers, discovered all diplomas for family members from 2nd grade Sunday School up through doctoral degrees. Other family documents include the family Bible, military enlistment or discharge papers and Certificates of Baptism. While certificates authenticate the dates and events in the family history, letters and journals are particularly revealing as to the character and thoughts of individual family members.

Similar to photographs, letters and journal entries document a single day in the life of a family member. Once these papers have been saved, it falls to members of the following generations to evaluate them. Are they to be preserved as part of the family story or discarded as inconsequential or even damaging to the family? For the most part unfavorable documents are discarded; that is not the family story this family wants to save.

The introduction of emails, IMs and other electronic messaging means that paper documents of family history are no longer regularly generated. Seldom is electronic communication printed out for the family files. The 19th and 20th centuries, providing access both to widespread literacy and to resources to create and preserve paper documents might mean that these forms of family history and lore are themselves becoming history.

Family customs[edit]

Each family has its own traditions, played out year after year, event after event. These traditions are frequently so engrained that the recognition of them as unique to this family only occurs when compared to other families. This is also an area of family folklore that is most exposed to change or modification. With each additional marriage or committed relationship, a new member from a different family gets added, an individual who does not recognize the family customs as "traditional". These new members bring their own traditions which need to be reconciled, perhaps added or even substituted into the current performance. Not only through marriage, but births and deaths also add a fluid dynamic to the family traditions. When the first grandchild is born, everyone moves into a new role, Mom becomes Grandmom, Brother becomes Uncle, and the family Benjamin loses his position to the new baby. These factors lead to a dynamic development of new and renewed family traditions.

One major and understudied area of family traditions is found in foodways, which includes everything involved in the procurement, preparation, serving and eating of daily meals at home.[22][23] Most of us go home each evening for dinner, wake up for breakfast and pack up a lunch or snack pack to take with us for the day. All the assumptions about how this occurs, who does what when arise only when the established process (i.e. family custom) hits a snag: we've run out of milk or someone ate the last of the cookies. Maybe Dad is off on a trip and can't make the Sunday morning pancakes.[10] Each of these food customs is understood and accepted by the group as a whole, and followed as a matter of course with little or no discussion.

It is also customary that family mealtimes differ: breakfast food differs from supper and snacks, weekends frequently vary from the weekday diet. In one busy family a scoop of ice cream on the breakfast cereal turned the meal into an easy, fun supper. There might also be a traditional Sunday Dinner to be prepared and staged weekly with an expanded family group gathered around the table.

Holidays and "life event" celebrations, from birthdays to wakes include multiple family customs, either superimposed upon the more broadly defined societal celebrations, or substituting for them. This is seen most obviously in traditions found in the preparation and "performance" of a holiday meal. Each family has their own unique traditions, from special dishes prepared only for this dinner, to a single individual who prepares and presents this single dish, to the individual assigned to carve the bird. It is unnecessary to mention examples of this; each North American reader is mentally reviewing the Thanksgiving traditions unique to his own family. This list of special holiday traditions in the family expands easily from the dining table to the family wake-up calls to the distribution of presents under the Christmas tree or Hanukah lights. Each of these, along with countless other details, distinguish this family as a unique social unit.

Another significant family tradition is that of naming customs. When a new baby is born, incorporating family names into the name for the new baby, or conversely not using family names for the next generation, can become problematic. What rules should be followed? Many ethnic groups have their own naming customs, variations of which might be found within the separate family groups of the parents. There are also differing ethnic customs of who has the authority to pick the name for the baby. When published lists of currently popular names along with expectations of individual family members are added to this mix, it can become a challenge to craft a name which pleases everyone.

Handicrafts and memorabilia[edit]

All possessions are considered pieces of material culture - objects with which members of a culture customarily surround themselves. However, only handicrafts produced by family members and memorabilia passed along through generations are of interest in family folklore.

Memorabilia are singular objects which are passed down through the family with the stories and memories about events or individuals attached to them. In one family a doll, given once as a Christmas present, continued to be brought out each year to celebrate Christmas and have her picture taken with the (changing) family. For her hundredth birthday, a birthday cake for the doll was included in the Christmas celebration.[24] Like the doll, almost any object imbued with family stories and memories can become a family heirloom. As such, it holds in the family a value often unrelated to its monetary value. As the stories and memories enveloping the object are slowly lost, the object itself becomes a simple hand-me-down, usually in poor condition and ready to be discarded.

Handicrafts are objects which have been "homemade", crafted individually using simple tools by one or more family members. The production skills for these artisanal crafts are generally transmitted within the family; the items might include weaving, welding, pottery, woodworking, quilting, basketry, cooking. They can be used functionally or as decoration in the home. Over time these handicrafts becomes a skill nurtured within the family, as well as a point of family identification for outsiders. The family cultivates both the production knowledge and the objects themselves.

One aspect of these objects, both family memorabilia and handicrafts, is that they are for the most part one-of-a-kind. Many family members can tell the story of the Christmas doll, or have the family photographs, but only one family branch can actually possess the doll. For handicrafts, a craftsman could decide to create a quilt or a rocking chair for each child in a family. But this just postpones the decision of ownership of the item to the following generation.

Each of these material objects carries along with its stories or memories the ability for family members to experience simultaneity in the home. "…by gathering around ourselves treasured objects from different times of our lives and our histories, we experience different eras at the same moment and in some way bring the totality of the past to bear upon the present."[25] The family history and identity is preserved and transmitted, both for the family member who walks past the bowl sitting on the counter, and the outsider who asks about the origin of the unique item. "The artifacts that family members make, use, or display can be an unseen backdrop to the duties and demands of family life. Alternatively, they might be carefully crafted statements about the values and expectations of family tradition bearers."[26] The candy bowl on the coffee table or the silver tea service set out in the dining room speak of an elegance of hospitality which is customary in this family.

Institutions involved in study of family folklore[edit]

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage[edit]

1967 marked the first Smithsonian Folklife Festival, set up on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. to exhibit and demonstrate crafts and customs of diverse ethnic, regional and occupational groups. Originally including only displays from the United States, it later expanded to include traditions and customs from around the world. Each exhibit at the festival endeavors to move beyond the items of tangible culture, the arts and objects we can touch, feel and put in a glass case. Each unique performance or display at the Folklife Festival articulates the goal of the Smithsonian Institution to spread its reach beyond material objects to artifacts of intangible cultural heritage.[27] Festival exhibits such as "The Changing Soundscape in Indian Country" (1992), "American Social Dance" (1993), "Mississippi Delta" (1997), "Asian Pacific Americans: Local Lives, Global Ties" (2010) are just a few of the exhibits included since the Festival began.[28] Any of these cultural intangibles, including traditions of performance, ritual, music, dance, traditional knowledge, storytelling or oral transmission, is considered for inclusion at the festival. Its intention is to "legitimize and celebrate individual Americans and their traditions".[29] Open to the public at no cost, the festival is devised to enable each visitor to find at least one exhibit which relates to his background, narrates a segment of his story.

In 1974 a new tent was added to the Festival. Instead of displaying or performing recognized traditions, its goal was to collect items of family folklore from visitors. This tent was unique at the festival in asking visitors to be active contributors to the folklife on display instead of merely receptive spectators. A sign at the tent was hopeful: "Family Folklore – Will You Share Yours With Us?"[29] Card tables with checkered table clothes were set up, tape recorders and folklore interviewers on hand to prompt, listen and record family lore which visitors might share. Not only should each visitor see himself somewhere in the exhibits, but he should also recognize and record parts of his own story as a unique and valued artifact of cultural heritage.

During the four years that the tent was included at the festival, it gradually cluttered with objects, memorabilia and photos just like any family home. Taking the taped interviews as a baseline, the stories and customs collected in the tent were used to establish an archive of family folklore as part of the Smithsonian collections. Representative pieces were then published in the book A Celebration of American Family Folklore: Tales and Traditions from the Smithsonian Collection.[6] This collection continues to be supported by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage[30] and the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress.

Since this first Smithsonian Folklife Festival, many regional festivals have been established in all parts of the country. These include the Northwest Folklife Festival, the New England Folk Festival and the Philadelphia Folk Festival to name just a few. Each of these is supported by various institutions of public folklore, with the goal of displaying traditions of regional, ethnic and occupational folk groups. None of them however has duplicated the Smithsonian Folklore tent intended to collect original family folklore.

Oral history and oral tradition projects[edit]

Oral history and oral tradition first became recognized as legitimate forms of historical and cultural research in the 1960s and early 1970s. Pioneers in this field used newly developed inexpensive tape-recorders to record oral histories. A Pulitzer Prize was awarded to Studs Terkel in 1985 for his book "The Good War": An Oral History of World War II and a special Pulitzer Prize was awarded to Alex Haley in 1977 for Roots: The Saga of an American Family. With these awards, the importance of oral histories and traditions as a bona fide tool of historical and cultural research was cemented.[31]

Historical and folklore research using oral interviews has gone mainstream, with multiple organizations dedicated to its collection. One of the best known organizations is StoryCorps, founded in 2003 and modeled on the WPA Federal Writers Project. Its expressed mission is to "record, preserve, and share stories of Americans from all backgrounds and beliefs". Special projects reach out to targeted populations to fulfill StoryCorps' commitment to record a diverse array of voices. The only requirement for the 2-person interview is that the 2 participants "care about each other", for instance family members. The participants are given a recording of the interview to take with them and add to the family archive.

StoryCorps is just one of many organizations with a goal of recording and preserving interviews of oral history and tradition. Other organizations abound, such as City Lore of New York City and the Oral History Society of London.

See also[edit]

[edit]

References[edit]

  • Danielson, Larry. (1996). "Family Folklore." in American Folklore: an Encyclopedia, ed. J. Brunvand. New York: Garland.
  • Dégh, Linda; Andrew Vázsonyi: "Hypothesis of Multi-Conduit Transmission in Folklore". In: Ben-Amos, Dan; Kenneth S. Goldstein: Folklore. Performance and Communication. Den Haag, Paris 1975; S. 207–255.
  • Glassie, Henry (1999). Material Culture. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  • Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Barbara. (1989). "Objects of Memory: Material Culture as Life Review." in Folk Groups and Folklore Genres: a Reader, ed. Elliott Oring. Logan: Utah State University Press.
  • Rudy, Jill Terry. (2003). "Family Folklore." International Encyclopedia of Marriage and Family. 2003. Encyclopedia.com. December 6, 2014.
  • Toelken, Barre (1996). The Dynamics of Folklore, revised and expanded edition. Logan: Utah State University Press. Pp 101 – 110. "Dynamics of Family Folklore".
  • Yocom, Margaret (1997). "Family Folklore." in Folklore: an Encyclopedia of Beliefs, Customs, Tales, Music, and Art, Vol. I, ed. Thomas Green. Santa Barbara, CA: abc-clio.
  • Zeitlin, Steve J.; Kotkin, A. J.; Baker, H. C., eds. (1992). A Celebration of American Family Folklore: Tales and Traditions from the Smithsonian Collection. Cambridge, MA: Yellow Moon Press.

Further reading[edit]

  • Bascom, William R. (1965). "Four Functions of Folklore." in The Study of Folklore, ed. Alan Dundes. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.
  • Danielson, Larry, ed. (1994). "Family Folklore: Special Issue." Southern folklore 51.
  • Gillis, John R. (1997). A World of Their Own Making: Myth, Ritual, and the Quest for Family Values. Harvard University Press; New edition (August 8, 1997)
  • Stone, Elizabeth. (1988). Black Sheep and Kissing Cousins: How our Family Stories Shape Us. New York: Times Books.
  • Thursby, Jacqueline S. (1999). Mother's Table, Father's Chair: Cultural Narratives of Basque American Women. Logan: Utah State University Press.
  • Wilson, William. a. (1991). "Personal Narratives: the Family Novel." Western Folklore 50:127–149.

External links[edit]

  1. ^ abMargaret R. Yocum (1997). "Family Folklore", pg. 279. In Folklore An Encyclopedia of Beliefs, Customs, Tales, Music, and Art, ed. Thomas Green. California / ABC-CLIO.
  2. ^Mody C. Boatright (1958). "The Family Saga as a Form of Folklore". In The Family Saga and Other Phases of American Folklore, eds. Mody C. Boatright, Robert B. Downs, and John T. Flanagan. Urbana / University of Illinois Press.
  3. ^Kim S. Garrett (1961), "Family Stories and Sayings", pp 273–281. In Publications of the Texas Folklore Society, Vol. XXX.
  4. ^L. Karen Baldwin (1975). Down on Bugger Run: Family Group and the Social Base of Folklore. University of Pennsylvania / Unpublished Dissertation.
  5. ^Polly Stewart (2008), "Karen Baldwin (1943 - 2007)", pp. 485–486. In Journal of American Folklore, Vol. 121, Fall 2008.
  6. ^ abcSteven J. Zeitlin, Amy J. Kotkin, and Holly Cutting Baker (1993). A Celebration of American Family Folklore: Tales and Traditions from the Smithsonian Collection, pg. 2. Cambridge / Yellow Moon.
  7. ^ abBarre Toelken (1996). The Dynamics of Folklore, pp 196–197. Utah / Utah State University Press.
  8. ^Sims, Martha C., Martine Stephens (2005). Living Folklore, pg 31. Utah / Utah State University Press.
  9. ^ abLinda Dégh and Andrew Vázsonyi (1975). "Hypothesis of Multi-Conduit Transmission in Folklore", pp. 207–255. In Folklore. Performance and Communication, ed. Dan Ben-Amos. Den Haag, Paris.
  10. ^ abThomas A. Adler (1981). "Making Pancakes on Sunday: The Male Cook in Family Tradition", pp. 45–55. In Western Folklore, Vol. 40.
  11. ^Margaret Yocum, Family Folklore, pg. 282.
  12. ^Zeitlin, pg 170.
  13. ^Catherine Noren (1976). The Camera of My Family. New York / Knopf, 1976.
  14. ^From 1974–1978
  15. ^For further examples including traditional heroes, rogues, survivors, migrants and more, see Zeitlin, pp. 10–125.
  16. ^Zeitlin, pg. 95
  17. ^Zeitlin, pg. 96.
  18. ^Told by the Riedel family from Freiburg, Germany. Recorded October 2014
  19. ^Told by the Wiley family from Seattle. Recorded June 2012.
  20. ^Zeitlin, pg. 146 ff.
  21. ^see Zeitlin, pg. 184 ff
  22. ^Michael Owen Jones (1983). Foodways and Eating Habits: Directions for Research Paperback. California Folklore Society.
  23. ^The American Folklore Society has a section dedicated completely to Foodways. Many other scholarly groups also consider the study of food traditions as part of their domain, including Gender Studies, Ethnic Studies, Ethnology as well as modern findings on Nutrition and Health.
  24. ^Zeitlin, pg. 203.
  25. ^Zeitlin, pg. 201.
  26. ^http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1G2-3406900153.html Jill Terry Rudy
  27. ^http://www.folklife.si.edu/cultural-heritage-policy/ICH/about/smithsonian
  28. ^Complete list of programs by year
  29. ^ abZeitlin, pg. 272.
  30. ^http://siarchives.si.edu/history/exhibits/pictures/center-folklife-and-cultural-heritage
  31. ^"Oral history"Columbia Encyclopedia

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